Windows 8.1 with a Mouse and Keyboard (in 5 Minutes)

View the full Article: alanpeto.com/tech/windows-8-mouse-keyboard/ (Also, here is another article about the Start Screen: alanpeto.com/…

25 Comments

  1. *Got a New Windows 8 PC Without a Touchscreen for Christmas?*

    Not to worry! #Windows8 is great with a mouse and keyboard. Check out
    my article and video here to learn more:
    http://www.alanpeto.com/tech/windows-8-mouse-keyboard/ 

  2. *Mouse and Keyboard With Windows 8.1?*
    YES you can!

    In my post/article/video yesterday regarding Windows 8.1 for Information
    Technologies people, a few comments talked about how W8 is just for tablets
    and touchscreens, and not good for mouse and keyboard. This is to be
    expected due to marketing and advertising, but actually W8 works fantastic
    with a mouse and keyboard.

    Check out the video with this post and also these two articles of mine:
    – Windows 8.1 with a Mouse and Keyboard: http://bit.ly/1cEw6Ib
    and
    – Windows 8.1 Start Screen Tips: http://bit.ly/1jXt4ST

    Now, this won’t convince everyone that W8 (and primarily the new modern
    interface portion and/or start screen) is for them, but the same thing
    happened to various degrees with Windows 95 came out. The Start menu and
    the interface was not always widely liked.

    #Microsoft #Windows #Windows8 

  3. Whoa…over 13,000 views! Thank you! :)

    My entire article can be found here (along with some other videos as well):
    http://bit.ly/1cEw6Ib

    #Microsoft #Windows8 #Windows 

  4. I still don’t like it. Windows 8 “was NOT my idea.”

  5. Still, the full-screen overlay of the Start Screen is annoying, even when
    launching apps by typing. Full-screen mess makes you work your brain extra
    time to remember what you were doing before invoking the Start Screen.
    Binding important but seldomly used spesial apps/scripts on the Task Bar is
    not really an option. Binding more than 10 apps on the Task Bar is useless,
    because Win+[0-9] keycombo works only for the first 10 bound apps. What’s
    wrong with a small, non-intrusive Start Menu, or even better, a horizontal
    type-and-choose style launcher like dmenu (Unix/X11)?

    Binding spesific Desktop mode programs on the Start Screen is just stupid.
    Thus, if you have more than 10 apps (Win+[0-9] keycombo) in your workflow,
    you have to deal with a full-screen launcher if you want to operate the
    computer quickly merely using nothing but keyboard.

    I use dozens of spesific scripts and one-time tools on my workflows. Having
    to deal with the full-screen bling bling crap just to cast a spesific spell
    is so damn annoying and stressing you cannot even imagine.

    I do not use mouse with Windows. Too slow, too intrusive, too lame.
    Keyboard comboing for the win.

    The basic Windows 8 UI is definitely designed for people who think and act
    slow (or are just not motivated to learn optimal usage methods). Not for
    professional with high demands on UI semantics.

  6. *Yes, Windows 8.1 Works Great With Mouse and Keyboard*

    So here’s the #1 thing you’ve probably heard online and from your techie
    friends: Windows 8 is horrible. It’s a train wreck. A disaster! Why?
    Because the Start ‘menu’ is gone, and now there is a Start screen.

    Digging further, they say the Start ‘screen’ (which is the new ‘modern
    interface’ Microsoft calls it) is only made for touchscreens and tablets,
    and works horribly with mouse and keyboard. In-fact, they would say,
    Microsoft is a failure for doing this because it’s utterly confusing for
    people to switch between the two ‘worlds’.

    My video shows you how in Windows 8.1 the Start screen (and new
    environment) and the desktop live perfectly together with a mouse and
    keyboard. I find myself to be more effective and faster than I ever way
    with Windows 7 (and below) using the Start menu.

    Hopefully my tips give you some idea of how to use it effectively.

    5 things to know:

    1) It’s really just Windows 7 with a Start screen. That’s right, it’s
    still the same operating system (with things fixed and upgraded, of course,
    to make it faster and better) with the Start menu removed and the Start
    screen introduced. That’s putting it a bit simply, but the point is your
    ‘desktop’ works like it did before (with a few cool new things you couldn’t
    do before like snap apps alongside your desktop view).

    2) For die-hards, you can ‘sign in’ right to the desktop and skip the start
    screen. It’s fast and easy to do. In the desktop, right-mouse click the
    taskbar, go to ‘navigation’, and you’ll see a few options for how ‘Start’
    works. Choose the one that signs you into the desktop.

    3) The Start screen is just your Start menu replacement. When organized
    and used correctly, it’s even faster than the Start menu. You can even pin
    “people” and “websites” to your Start screen for regularly updated content
    (convenient!).

    4) Mouse and Keyboard work just fine. I don’t have a touchscreen computer,
    and found it very easy to use Windows 8. With Windows 8.1, I noticed they
    added even more ‘tweaks’ that made it even easier for mouse and keyboard
    users in the modern interface/Start screen.

    5) Power users will like Windows 8.1 too. Remember, the start screen is
    just your start menu replacement. If you can’t live without the ancient
    menu, there are replacements out there. You can also set your start screen
    (when the button is clicked) to go to the ‘Apps’ list, which is similar to
    your old menu. Multiple monitor support has been added, and being able to
    ‘snap’ multiple programs has also been added. You’ll find the multitasking
    features even better by having those Windows Store apps snapped by your
    desktop (such as Twitter on your left, with your desktop taking up the rest
    of the screen). Finally, all your regular desktop apps can still be pinned
    to the Start screen (and you can make them into small icons too). I
    recommend you change the ‘wallpaper’ for the Start screen to match your
    desktop wallpaper (makes the transition very smooth and less jarring).

    The ability to have a common interface coming to desktops, laptops,
    tablets, and phones is of course not without growing pains, but it makes
    perfect sense. The common objection (as explained above) is that this is a
    ‘tablet interface’, and it’s not entirely. It works just fine for desktop
    users…if you are open to it. And I think that’s the key…if you are
    closed to anything new (and this is drastically new to a certain degree),
    you miss the opportunities it provides you.

    More Resources:

    – Windows 8.1 and Windows RT 8.1 Online Guide (with videos):
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/how-to

    – The Start Screen:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/start-screen-tutorial

    – Living With the Windows 8 Start Screen:
    http://www.extremetech.com/computing/135762-living-with-the-windows-8-start-screen
    (note that this refers to Windows 8, and not the 8.1 upgrade which actually
    resolved a few concerns the writer had)

  7. Whoa…over 13,000 views! Thank you! :)

    My entire article can be found here (along with some other videos as well):
    http://bit.ly/1cEw6Ib

    #Microsoft #Windows8 #Windows 

  8. *Yes, Windows 8.1 Works Great With Mouse and Keyboard*

    So here’s the #1 thing you’ve probably heard online and from your techie
    friends: Windows 8 is horrible. It’s a train wreck. A disaster! Why?
    Because the Start ‘menu’ is gone, and now there is a Start screen.

    Digging further, they say the Start ‘screen’ (which is the new ‘modern
    interface’ Microsoft calls it) is only made for touchscreens and tablets,
    and works horribly with mouse and keyboard. In-fact, they would say,
    Microsoft is a failure for doing this because it’s utterly confusing for
    people to switch between the two ‘worlds’.

    My video shows you how in Windows 8.1 the Start screen (and new
    environment) and the desktop live perfectly together with a mouse and
    keyboard. I find myself to be more effective and faster than I ever way
    with Windows 7 (and below) using the Start menu.

    Hopefully my tips give you some idea of how to use it effectively.

    5 things to know:

    1) It’s really just Windows 7 with a Start screen. That’s right, it’s
    still the same operating system (with things fixed and upgraded, of course,
    to make it faster and better) with the Start menu removed and the Start
    screen introduced. That’s putting it a bit simply, but the point is your
    ‘desktop’ works like it did before (with a few cool new things you couldn’t
    do before like snap apps alongside your desktop view).

    2) For die-hards, you can ‘sign in’ right to the desktop and skip the start
    screen. It’s fast and easy to do. In the desktop, right-mouse click the
    taskbar, go to ‘navigation’, and you’ll see a few options for how ‘Start’
    works. Choose the one that signs you into the desktop.

    3) The Start screen is just your Start menu replacement. When organized
    and used correctly, it’s even faster than the Start menu. You can even pin
    “people” and “websites” to your Start screen for regularly updated content
    (convenient!).

    4) Mouse and Keyboard work just fine. I don’t have a touchscreen computer,
    and found it very easy to use Windows 8. With Windows 8.1, I noticed they
    added even more ‘tweaks’ that made it even easier for mouse and keyboard
    users in the modern interface/Start screen.

    5) Power users will like Windows 8.1 too. Remember, the start screen is
    just your start menu replacement. If you can’t live without the ancient
    menu, there are replacements out there. You can also set your start screen
    (when the button is clicked) to go to the ‘Apps’ list, which is similar to
    your old menu. Multiple monitor support has been added, and being able to
    ‘snap’ multiple programs has also been added. You’ll find the multitasking
    features even better by having those Windows Store apps snapped by your
    desktop (such as Twitter on your left, with your desktop taking up the rest
    of the screen). Finally, all your regular desktop apps can still be pinned
    to the Start screen (and you can make them into small icons too). I
    recommend you change the ‘wallpaper’ for the Start screen to match your
    desktop wallpaper (makes the transition very smooth and less jarring).

    The ability to have a common interface coming to desktops, laptops,
    tablets, and phones is of course not without growing pains, but it makes
    perfect sense. The common objection (as explained above) is that this is a
    ‘tablet interface’, and it’s not entirely. It works just fine for desktop
    users…if you are open to it. And I think that’s the key…if you are
    closed to anything new (and this is drastically new to a certain degree),
    you miss the opportunities it provides you.

    More Resources:

    – Windows 8.1 and Windows RT 8.1 Online Guide (with videos):
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/how-to

    – The Start Screen:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/start-screen-tutorial

    – Living With the Windows 8 Start Screen:
    http://www.extremetech.com/computing/135762-living-with-the-windows-8-start-screen
    (note that this refers to Windows 8, and not the 8.1 upgrade which actually
    resolved a few concerns the writer had)

  9. like mouse and keyboard more 

  10. Lets say you were left handed and your touch pad is always switching to
    another app because you are always working from the left.on the touch pad.
    this is horrible and I cannot change it. I can change the mouse for left
    handed but there is no way to change the touch pad for left handed. I HATE
    WINDOWS 8. I will never recommend such huge failure.

  11. Could you help me? My 8.1 windows does not acknowledges the device mouse
    for a long period of time! It could be a USB port problem? how do i fix?
    Maybe there is a degenerate file… I dont now…

  12. wait its just like win 7 just without the start button?
    i just cant stand this phone interface on my big pc screen.
    so i bought a device with gesture recognition that allows me using it as if
    my new pc were touch screen but it still feel slike a phone interface.

  13. See, I like Windows 8.1! The problem I’m having is that now my mouse
    doesn’t work. :( In fact, no mouse I plug in works anymore. Do you know a
    work around for this issue?

  14. Hi Alan, thanks for this video. I was disappointed, at first, with win 8.1
    and about to downgrade to 7 but now I’ll give it one more try. 

  15. I wish this had been a real beginner’s tutorial. 2 of the only things that
    new users/beginners ARE able to figure out is how to switch between screens
    and search…it was in all Microsoft’s commercials before product launch.

    A real tutorial of how to ADD or CHANGE a tile or even more importantly,
    how to just put a shortcut for a program on the desktop would have actually
    been useful. When I upgraded from Win 8 to 8.1 my tile for Internet
    Explorer browser disappeared. After over an hour of trying to find it and
    put it back on the desktop and as a tile I finally gave up and just
    installed another of the many 3rd party REAL start menu replacement (after
    trying several I found one called StartIsBack which duplicates the Win 7
    start menu perfectly). I was able to at least add the program back to my
    desktop in about 3 seconds.

    Win 8.1 is DEFINITELY better at handling memory and therefore speed so I
    will agree that it is faster. But to call this a tutorial (hit the already
    marked button and start typing to search) is misleading since those are the
    only things that are either visually obvious or are the only things that MS
    actually has already shown people themselves on television commercials. A
    real beginner’s video would be greatly appreciated.

  16. What’s wrong with 8. Many people keeps complaining without giving it a
    chance

  17. thank you that was very helpful. I was about to think I had made a mistake
    of buying windows 8

  18. helps allot but what about the scrolling can you lock it i have problems
    right now and i fix it then it change back again (i cant scroll up or down
    or tap two fingers for the right click feature)

  19. Hi Alan, thanks for this video. I was disappointed, at first, with win 8.1
    and about to downgrade to 7 but now I’ll give it one more try. 

  20. Great Video Alan….Your video does a very nice job of showing the public
    that Windows 8.1 is not that terrible as people might have thought. I am
    much more likely to give it a try on at least one test system that I have.

    One Question. Where did you get that Awesome Wallpaper ? ***smile*** I
    know this may be a really silly question, but I find your wallpaper to be
    very relaxing to look at. Thanks if you can share a link for me.

    Best Regards,
    Alex

  21. Extremely good video for windows 8.1 . Thanks a lot, I did learn quite a
    few things.

  22. Thanks Jack!

  23. Even Microsoft admits that Windows 8 and 8.1 is not fully functional with
    wireless keyboards and mice. Update 1 tried to address this issue and
    Update 2 will try to fix update 1 failures.

  24. *Yes, Windows 8.1 Works Great With Mouse and Keyboard*

    So here’s the #1 thing you’ve probably heard online and from your techie
    friends: Windows 8 is horrible. It’s a train wreck. A disaster! Why?
    Because the Start ‘menu’ is gone, and now there is a Start screen.

    Digging further, they say the Start ‘screen’ (which is the new ‘modern
    interface’ Microsoft calls it) is only made for touchscreens and tablets,
    and works horribly with mouse and keyboard. In-fact, they would say,
    Microsoft is a failure for doing this because it’s utterly confusing for
    people to switch between the two ‘worlds’.

    My video shows you how in Windows 8.1 the Start screen (and new
    environment) and the desktop live perfectly together with a mouse and
    keyboard. I find myself to be more effective and faster than I ever way
    with Windows 7 (and below) using the Start menu.

    Hopefully my tips give you some idea of how to use it effectively.

    5 things to know:

    1) It’s really just Windows 7 with a Start screen. That’s right, it’s
    still the same operating system (with things fixed and upgraded, of course,
    to make it faster and better) with the Start menu removed and the Start
    screen introduced. That’s putting it a bit simply, but the point is your
    ‘desktop’ works like it did before (with a few cool new things you couldn’t
    do before like snap apps alongside your desktop view).

    2) For die-hards, you can ‘sign in’ right to the desktop and skip the start
    screen. It’s fast and easy to do. In the desktop, right-mouse click the
    taskbar, go to ‘navigation’, and you’ll see a few options for how ‘Start’
    works. Choose the one that signs you into the desktop.

    3) The Start screen is just your Start menu replacement. When organized
    and used correctly, it’s even faster than the Start menu. You can even pin
    “people” and “websites” to your Start screen for regularly updated content
    (convenient!).

    4) Mouse and Keyboard work just fine. I don’t have a touchscreen computer,
    and found it very easy to use Windows 8. With Windows 8.1, I noticed they
    added even more ‘tweaks’ that made it even easier for mouse and keyboard
    users in the modern interface/Start screen.

    5) Power users will like Windows 8.1 too. Remember, the start screen is
    just your start menu replacement. If you can’t live without the ancient
    menu, there are replacements out there. You can also set your start screen
    (when the button is clicked) to go to the ‘Apps’ list, which is similar to
    your old menu. Multiple monitor support has been added, and being able to
    ‘snap’ multiple programs has also been added. You’ll find the multitasking
    features even better by having those Windows Store apps snapped by your
    desktop (such as Twitter on your left, with your desktop taking up the rest
    of the screen). Finally, all your regular desktop apps can still be pinned
    to the Start screen (and you can make them into small icons too). I
    recommend you change the ‘wallpaper’ for the Start screen to match your
    desktop wallpaper (makes the transition very smooth and less jarring).

    The ability to have a common interface coming to desktops, laptops,
    tablets, and phones is of course not without growing pains, but it makes
    perfect sense. The common objection (as explained above) is that this is a
    ‘tablet interface’, and it’s not entirely. It works just fine for desktop
    users…if you are open to it. And I think that’s the key…if you are
    closed to anything new (and this is drastically new to a certain degree),
    you miss the opportunities it provides you.

    More Resources:

    – Windows 8.1 and Windows RT 8.1 Online Guide (with videos):
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/how-to

    – The Start Screen:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/start-screen-tutorial

    – Living With the Windows 8 Start Screen:
    http://www.extremetech.com/computing/135762-living-with-the-windows-8-start-screen
    (note that this refers to Windows 8, and not the 8.1 upgrade which actually
    resolved a few concerns the writer had)

  25. *Mouse and Keyboard With Windows 8.1?*
    YES you can!

    In my post/article/video yesterday regarding Windows 8.1 for Information
    Technologies people, a few comments talked about how W8 is just for tablets
    and touchscreens, and not good for mouse and keyboard. This is to be
    expected due to marketing and advertising, but actually W8 works fantastic
    with a mouse and keyboard.

    Check out the video with this post and also these two articles of mine:
    – Windows 8.1 with a Mouse and Keyboard: http://bit.ly/1cEw6Ib
    and
    – Windows 8.1 Start Screen Tips: http://bit.ly/1jXt4ST

    Now, this won’t convince everyone that W8 (and primarily the new modern
    interface portion and/or start screen) is for them, but the same thing
    happened to various degrees with Windows 95 came out. The Start menu and
    the interface was not always widely liked.

    #Microsoft #Windows #Windows8 

Comments are closed.